WHEN SHOULD YOU START TRAVEL NURSING?
Andrew Wettengel / Friday, December 15, 2017 / Categories: Work World, Travel

WHEN SHOULD YOU START TRAVEL NURSING?

How’s that title for an open-ended question, huh? It’s a query I’m sure you’ve asked yourself before.

Whether you’re a travel nursing veteran of 20 years or you’ve never taken a single assignment, every travel nursing career has a starting point. If you’re wondering if your time is now, we’re going to get real for a minute and give you a couple of things you should consider when trying to answer this question for yourself. 

Are you comfortable?

What we mean is are you confident in your abilities, so much so that you could step into a completely foreign environment and still rock? It’s OK if you’re not there yet. Most travel nurses work in their profession for at least a couple of years honing their craft before venturing out into the wide world of travel nursing. We don’t actually want you to be able to do your job with your eyes closed, but if you feel like you could some days, you’re on your way to being ready to start travel nursing.

Are you mobile?

Who will your travel excursions affect? Traveling with your family is possible [Link to family travel blog here], but many veteran travel nurses opt not to, especially if they have school-age children. Take a step back and look at your life to determine who your travel will affect and if that effect will be positive or worth the change.

What’s your motivation?

Travel nursing can be financially rewarding, but money alone shouldn’t be your only motivation for embarking on a traveling career. If you’re ready to learn new skills, help people in areas of need or build your resume for a future permanent position, then travel nursing can help you reach these goals.

Are you ready for a new adventure?

The previous question spoke to the developmental properties of travel nursing, and it’s true, the profession is very appealing for young nurses looking to expand their resume. At the same time, we also work with a wide array of retired nurses embarking on a second career as a travel nurse. These nurses finally have the free time to enjoy the best aspect of travel nursing: traveling while still enjoying a profession they love. That pairing is simply too good to pass up.

We can’t say we blame them. But what about you? We hope the questions posed above will help you determine if travel nursing is right for you. When you decide it is, reach out. We’d love to hear from you.

 

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